Around Town: Blagden Alley

Tucked away in the Shaw neighborhood of Northwest DC is a pair of twisting alleyways that date back to pre-Civil War times: Blagden Alley and Naylor Court. The beautiful Victorian rowhouses on the outward-facing part of the block housed upper-class Washingtonians, while the alley-facing buildings housed mixed-race working class professionals. Continue reading “Around Town: Blagden Alley”

In Bloom

It was a flower-filled weekend. The Cherry Blossoms opened this weekend in Washington DC’s Tidal Basin. They also opened on the trees outside of my apartment.

This year, the trees were not their usual bright and fluffy pink, having lost half of the blossoms in a freeze/winter storm a few weeks ago. The trees, from afar, are a muted pink with splotches of brown, where the dead blossoms still hang.  Continue reading “In Bloom”

Around Town: Cherry Blossoms

Washington, DC is on track for an early Cherry Blossom bloom this year (between March 14 and March 17), perhaps the earliest bloom on record.You can get official updates of the anticipated bloom time here.

In anticipation, here are some of my favorite DC Cherry Blossom photos from years past. Continue reading “Around Town: Cherry Blossoms”

Boston: Doors of the City on a Hill

I traveled to Boston recently and took a lot of pictures (see previous post for more on the City on the Hill). The doors in Boston were much like the people that call the city home: bold, full of character, and a little rebellious.
boston_reddoors_bigandlittleBeacon Hill, Human Door and Hobbit Door?

boston_doors_backbay_blueNorth End, Hull Street #36 / Back Bay #78

boston_multi-doorsBack Bay #13

bostondoors_backbay_orangegreenBack Bay #35 / Beacon Hill #28

boston_found_hotelFound Hotel. Okay fine, those are windows. But they are emergency doors. 

boston_rowhousesBack Bay #53, 51, 49, featuring icicles. 

Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Perspective

My initiatory Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge post takes me back to last summer, when I visited Charleston, South Carolina in the dead of summer.

A short drive out of downtown on the way to Folly Beach, you’ll find (what is suspected to be) the oldest living tree in the U.S., the Angel Oak Tree. The Angel Oak Tree is estimated to be between 400 and 500 years old. Find more facts on the tree here. The visitors, like me, stood back and marveled at the tree before moving in closer between the intertwined branches for a closer inspection.
angeloaktree_southcarolina

Updated: Selected as a featured blogger! Thank you Cee. feature_blogger_cees